Beet Juice for High Blood Pressure: Does it Work

by John Staughton (BASc, BFA) last updated -

 Likes  Comments

Consuming beet juice for high blood pressure is a popular new revelation in natural medicine, but before you change your health routine, it’s best to understand all the details.

Beet Juice for High Blood Pressure

Recent studies have found that beet juice does, in fact, lower blood pressure, which is very good news for those who are struggling with hypertension. There are many natural and pharmaceutical ways to lower blood pressure, such as by taking beta blockers or increasing your potassium intake on a daily basis, and beet juice is the newest remedy on the market.

The study found that within 4-5 hours of consuming 1 cup of beet juice, blood pressure decreased by approximately 4-5 points. That may not seem like a major change, but the clear effect of beet juice on hypertension is exciting. As it turns out, there are inorganic nitrates in high quantities in beet juice, which are converted into nitric oxide in the body. Nitric oxide has vasodilation properties, meaning that it can help to relax blood vessels and arteries, thus reducing the strain on the cardiovascular system.

Jar of beetroot juice alongside a heart-shaped piece of beet with beet cubes scattered at the front and blurred beets at the back.

Try beet juice for its intense earthy and sweet flavors. Photo Credit: Shutterstock

Research is ongoing regarding the long-term impact of drinking beet juice or consuming beets to help improve blood pressure, but the early results are very promising.

Side Effects of Beet Juice

Despite the positive benefits that this unusual vegetable can have on your heart health, there are also some side effects of consuming beets. These include discoloration of your urine, and while this is harmless, it can be a bit of a shock. Furthermore, the high level of oxalic acid in beets can have a negative effect on your kidneys and gallbladder. When you have too much oxalic acid, it can exacerbate the formation of gallstone and kidneys stones. Therefore, always use beets in moderation.

DMCA.com Protection Status
About the Author

John Staughton is a traveling writer, editor, publisher and photographer with English and Integrative Biology degrees from the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana (USA). He co-founded the literary journal, Sheriff Nottingham, and now serves as the Content Director for Stain’d Arts, a non-profit based in Denver, Colorado. On a perpetual journey towards the idea of home, he uses words to educate, inspire, uplift and evolve.

Rate this article
Average rating 4.2 out of 5.0 based on 53 user(s).

Latest Health News:

A woman clinician injecting a young girl.

Increase Screening Of Asymptomatic People For COVID Control

With the coronavirus pandemic showing signs of slowing down, there is an increased need for precaution to ensure that it does not flare up again. New research,…

READ MORE
Group of wood figurines huddled together with one figure outside the group.

Pandemics, Epidemics Can Worsen Social Prejudices

A time of crisis can exacerbate our social prejudices, particularly bigotry and xenophobia. A study, published in the journal Proceedings of The Royal Society,…

READ MORE
Graphic of the human brain

Research Reveals How Memory Works

Why do our memories not get muddled with other new events? Why are they long-lasting? Researchers from the University of Bristol may have found answers to…

READ MORE