Can Dogs Eat Celery

by John Staughton (BASc, BFA) last updated -

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For dog owners, it may be worrying when dogs eat celery, particularly if you don’t know about the potential risks. Before feeding your dog any human food, it is always a good idea to do your research and understand what effects celery might have on your canine companion.

Generally speaking, celery is perfectly safe for dogs, but in moderation. The diet for most dogs should provide all of the essential minerals and nutrients they need, but occasional supplementation with tasty vegetables or fruits is good. There is no inherent danger to dogs when it comes to celery, as most of this vegetable is composed of water, and dogs seem to enjoy this common snack!

Risks of Feeding Celery to Dogs

Although there are no serious risks when dogs eat celery, there are a few potential side effects to consider, such as gastrointestinal distress, possible choking hazard, and toxicity from pesticides, among others.

Stomach Issues – Since there is a decent amount of fibrous material in celery, some dogs may struggle to pass their bowels normally if they eat an excessive amount of celery. Be sure to only give your pup celery, in moderation.

Choking – The stringy nature of celery can represent a choking hazard for some dogs, particularly if you have a pup. Always chop celery into small, manageable bites before giving them to your pooch, to prevent any risk of choking.

Toxicity – Depending on where you get your celery, it may have been treated with any number of pesticides or herbicides. Always wash your fresh vegetables after bringing them back from the store, especially if you plan on tossing a few celery sticks to your dog as a snack.

How much Celery can Dogs eat?

Moderation is always key when giving your dog human food, and your portion size is obviously dependent on the size of your dog. Generally speaking, human food shouldn’t make up more than 10% of a dog’s diet. When it comes to celery, you can chop up a quarter-stick into small bites and give them to your dog as a treat once a week or so. You should also add some diversity to your dog’s diet, so try mixing in carrots or broccoli, rather than sticking to one type of vegetable.

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About the Author

John Staughton is a traveling writer, editor, publisher and photographer with English and Integrative Biology degrees from the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana (USA). He co-founded the literary journal, Sheriff Nottingham, and now serves as the Content Director for Stain’d Arts, a non-profit based in Denver, Colorado. On a perpetual journey towards the idea of home, he uses words to educate, inspire, uplift and evolve.

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