Ginger Root Tea – Benefits, How To Make And Side Effects

Ginger root tea has a number of health benefits, including balancing stress levels, soothing the digestive system, eliminating morning sickness, curing colds and coughs, eliminating inflammation, reducing menstruation symptoms, suppressing tumor growth, healing respiratory conditions and lowering blood pressure. There are some side effects of ginger tea, including stomach upset and inflammation, if too much is consumed, or if you suffer from a ginger allergy.

This popular and potent tea is easy to make and has been a major part of traditional medicines for thousands of years. Ginger is a flowering plant that is a probable native of Southeastern Asia, although it has now spread around the world. Typically used in culinary and medicinal applications, its tea has become a first line of defense for the common cold and a number of other common health concerns.

Benefits of Ginger Root Tea

Most of the benefits of ginger root tea are associated with its antioxidant, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, digestive, antispasmodic, expectorant, hypotensive, anti-tumor and relaxant properties. These effects are partially due to the presence of dietary fiber, calcium, magnesium and vitamin C, but primarily as a result of the volatile oils and antioxidants found in ginger, particularly gingerol.

Cold and Cough: The antioxidant and antibacterial effects of ginger are well known, and in tea form, it can also have expectorant and anti-inflammatory properties, making it ideal for soothing and eliminating colds and coughs, and speeding the recovery process.

Anti-Inflammatory: Ginger has an active ingredient, gingerol, that has potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, helping this tea reduce the pain and discomfort of inflammation in the body, from arthritis and joint disorders to headaches, fevers, cramps and muscle aches.

Menstruation Concerns: Ginger root tea has been used for thousands of years to treat painful or irregular periods. It is particularly good as an anti-spasmodic, which helps to relieve painful cramps associated with menstruation.

Anti-Tumor Activity: One of the most important effects of ginger root is its anti-tumor and antioxidant properties. The active ingredients, which are released in ginger root tea, are purported to prevent tumor formation, which means a lower risk of developing cancer of various types.

Stress Levels: Ginger root tea can directly impact the health and function of the adrenal glands, which are crucial for proper management of stress hormone levels in the body. Excess cortisol and other stress hormones can impact metabolic activity and wear down the body, leaving the immune system vulnerable to attack. Ginger root tea can heal the adrenal glands and ensure that your stress hormone levels are properly modulated.

Digestive Issues: Ginger in all its forms, including tea, is excellent for treating stomach upset, excess flatulence, bloating and cramping. It is also excellent for nausea and vomiting, especially when those symptoms are related to chemotherapy treatment. Pregnant women in their first trimester who use ginger root tea also report that it quickly soothes morning sickness.

How Do You Make Ginger Root Tea?

Ginger root tea can easily be made at home, using only fresh ginger root, water, a handful of common herbs, and honey or lemon, for flavor. Unlike many herbal teas, ginger root tea, as the name implies, is made from the rhizome of the ginger plant, where many of the nutrients are concentrated. It takes no more than 20 minutes to make, but can provide relief for certain health concerns all day!

Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 1-inch piece of fresh ginger root (thoroughly washed)
  • 2 cups of water (filtered)
  • 1 teaspoon of rosemary (optional)
  • 1 teaspoon of honey (optional, for flavor)

Step 1 – Slice the fresh ginger root thinly, into 5-6 slices

Step 2 – Add the ginger and water to a saucepan and bring the water up to a boil. If desired, you can add the rosemary at this point for extra spice.

Step 3 – Once the water reaches a boil, bring it back down to a simmer and allow it to cook for approximately 10 minutes. Wait until the water is a dark, rich color and smells strongly of ginger.

Step 4 – Remove from heat and allow the mixture to cool for 1-2 minutes.

Step 5 – Strain into a tea cup (or pitcher for larger batches), add honey (if desired) and enjoy!

How to Make Ginger Root Tea for Cold?

Ginger root tea is very effective for colds, particularly when combined with other immune system-stimulating spices, such as cayenne pepper, garlic, lemon juice and honey.

Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 1-inch slice of fresh ginger root (thoroughly washed)
  • 2 cups of water
  • 1-2 tablespoons of organic honey
  • 1-2 garlic cloves (minced)
  • 1/2 teaspoon of cayenne pepper
  • 1 tablespoon of lemon juice

Step 1 – Slice the ginger root finely into 5-6 slices

Step 2 – Add ginger to a pot with water and bring it to a boil.

Step 3 – Lower heat and allow the mixture to simmer for 4-5 minutes in the covered pot.

Step 4 – Add cayenne pepper and simmer for another 1-2 minutes.

Step 5 – Remove from heat and allow to cool for 1-2 minutes. Add honey, lemon juice and garlic.

Step 6 – Stir thoroughly until the honey is dissolved, and then enjoy!

How to Make Ginger Root Tea for Cough?

Ginger root tea is highly effective for coughs and congestions, due to its expectorant and anti-inflammatory properties, especially when the recipe also includes peppermint and honey.

Recipe

Ingredients: 

  • 2-inch slice of fresh ginger root (thoroughly washed)
  • 2 teaspoons of dried peppermint
  • 4 cups of water (filtered)
  • 2 tablespoons of organic honey

Step 1 – Grate the ginger into fine slices (12-14 slices)

Step 2 – Add the ginger, dried peppermint and water into a pot and bring it to a boil

Step 3 – Cover the mixture and allow it to steep for 5-7 minutes.

Step 4 – Remove from the heat and stir in the honey.

Step 5 – You can take small sips of this concentrated tea once every few hours to soothe your cough and coat your throat. Drinking entire cups of this mixture is not necessary for best results.

Note: You can also add a pinch of black pepper to this tea, which can further help cut through mucus and eliminate congestion.

Ginger Root Tea Side Effects

Drinking ginger tea may have some side effects that include:

  • Stomach upset
  • Heartburn
  • Allergy- mild swelling or irritation on the lips, gums and tongue
  • Lower blood pressure
  • Light headedness

Discontinue use immediately if these symptoms appear. It also functions as a blood-thinner, so people undergoing surgery or currently on warfarin treatment should avoid use of this herbal remedy. Again, these side effects are generally only experienced when a large amount of ginger is consumed in a day – more than 4 grams – which is unlikely with this tea preparation, even if you drink 2-3 cups per day.


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