Vapers Show Chemical Changes Linked To Cancer

by Paromita Datta published on -

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E-cig use may have a deeper and longer-term impact than previously thought. New research, published in the journal Epigenetics revealed that vaping may cause chemical changes in the DNA of its users, mirroring changes in smokers. More worryingly, these changes, also known as epigenetic changes, are also found in all types of human cancers and other serious diseases.

Man using a vaping device

Know your e-cig device and understand the risks it can pose. Photo Credit: Shutterstock

The study was conducted by a team of scientists from the Keck School of Medicine of USC. The team studied 45 volunteers, dividing them into three groups: smokers, vapers and the control group with non-vaping, non-smoking participants. The team conducted blood tests to check for chemical changes in the DNA that impact gene activity. These changes affect gene expression and genomic stability at different stages of development.

The current research is a continuation of an earlier study by the team where they found an abnormal number of gene expressions in people who vape or smoke. These changes do not necessarily mean that these people would develop cancer. However, it may indicate exposure to cancer-causing elements in vaping instruments.

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About the Author

Paromita Datta covers the latest health and wellness trends for Organic Facts. An ex-journalist who specialized in health and entertainment news, Paromita was responsible for managing a health supplement for The New Indian Express, a leading national daily in India. She has completed her post-graduation in Business Administration from the University of Rajasthan and her diploma in journalism from YMCA, Delhi. She has completed an e-course, Introduction to Food and Health, from Stanford University, US.

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