What is Ice Wine

by John Staughton last updated -

 Likes  Comments

If you’ve never been offered a chilled glass of ice wine, you’ve been missing out on a unique and sweet alcoholic treat.

What is Ice Wine?

Quite simply, ice wine is an alcoholic beverage made from frozen grapes. When it comes to flavor, ice wine is high in sugar and has a very sweet taste, which is balanced by the high acidity. This wine can have a higher sugar percentage than some sodas and is primarily enjoyed as a dessert wine, as it does not pair particularly well with savory dishes.

Regulations state that to be called ‘Ice Wine’, the beverage must be made from grapes that froze on the vine naturally. True ice wine, therefore, only comes from regions with a cold climate. Most of this wine in the world comes from Germany or Ontario, Canada. There are producers in the US, as well as Japan, Austria, France, and several other European countries, but it isn’t nearly as popular or widespread as traditional grape-growing.

Most German ‘Eiswein’ is made from their prized native Riesling grapes, whereas Canadians favor the Vidal Blanc varietal. Cabernet Franc grapes result in a red Icewine, and modern producers are using everything from Chardonnay and Chenin Blanc to Cabernet Sauvignon. This market used to be quite narrow, but it has blossomed in recent years as its popularity has grown. Most varieties of this wine have an ABV of around 10%, although they can range from 6-13%.

How to Drink Ice Wine?

There are many different ways to drink ice wine, let us take a look at them.

  • Chill, don’t freeze, to 50-54 degrees Fahrenheit to enjoy the natural aromas.
  • Pour 1.5-2 oz into a standard white wine glass. Remember, a little of this sweet wine goes a long way.
  • Enjoy with cheese, fruit, scones or other less sweet desserts.

How to Make Ice Wine?

Let us take a look at how to make ice wine.

  • Step 1: A strong press is needed to crush rock-hard frozen grapes.
  • Step 2: The pressed frozen juice is collected, and yeast is added.
  • Step 3: The fermentation process will take several weeks.
  • Step 4: Once it has reached optimal alcohol and sugar content, it can be bottled and enjoyed!
About the Author

John Staughton is a traveling writer, editor, and publisher who earned his English and Integrative Biology degrees from the University of Illinois in Champaign, Urbana (USA). He is the co-founder of a literary journal, Sheriff Nottingham, and calls the most beautiful places in the world his office. On a perpetual journey towards the idea of home, he uses words to educate, inspire, uplift and evolve.

Rate this article
Average rating 4.5 out of 5.0 based on 1 user(s).

Sign-up for wellness newsletter


Do you want the best of science-backed health & nutrition information in your inbox? If yes, please share your email to subscribe.

* indicates required
We'll never share your email with anyone else.
/ ( mm / dd )